The outsiders of the Champions League final show that football is not dead

In a campaign dominated by big spenders while bookies favourites have won all titles, the final of the Champions League Liverpool against Tottenham is an exception.

The outsiders of the Champions League final show that football is not dead
The outsiders of the Champions League final show that football is not dead

Developed through the ages, codified in Victorian England, deceased in 2019.

The most popular sport in the world may be irrevocably altered, but a feeling that it has been damaged, fractured and removed from its roots has recently been reflected.

The successes continued to succeed, keeping the top five European championship titles. Man City has achieved an unprecedented treble by recording the biggest FA Cup victory.

It is a procession to the glory of the favourites else the argument went late.

The outsiders of the Champions League final show that football is not dead
The outsiders of the Champions League final show that football is not dead

Except that the final of the Champions League represents an embarrassing refutation of this theory. Liverpool and Tottenham may play in the richest league in the world, but their journey to Madrid – the Spurs’ in particular, was marked by drama to recall the initial and innate appeal of the game.

These campaigns are not intended to spend more than everyone else. Tottenham, as they say, has not bought anyone since January 2018.

Liverpool may have spent huge sums of money on Virgil van Dijk and Alisson, but they can claim that the sale of Philippe Coutinho has financed both the £ 142m it has made, a record profit of £ 125m last year and that, generated by the Champions League, they generate their own income.

In the midst of modern fares, Liverpool’s progress and staff are out of date. Final is not far away and champions league fanatics have got their Champions League final tickets.

The camp may be more cosmopolitan, larger amounts, idiosyncratic tactics, but there are threads that cross their successes.

It is a challenge that traditionalists can rejoice.

Their players often have modest origins. For Andy Robertson, a defenseman with a resume at Queen’s Park, read Alan Hansen, this former Partick Thistle.

See Alan Kennedy for Xherdan Shaqiri, Gini Wijnaldum and Robertson, all relegated from the Premier League to their former employers.

Mark Lawrenson, a member of a South Coast club in Brighton, looks at the Old Boys Battalion in Southampton.

For Trent Alexander-Arnold, the local who played in a Champions League final in his first football season think of Sammy Lee.

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